aNaMaRiA ~ artblog

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

KidLitVic 2017 :)


I had an amazing time at KidLitVic! Met lovely people and received fantastic advice and feedback regarding my work as a visual storyteller. I also learnt about the KidLit industry from inspiring hardworking passionate professionals! I am truly grateful for the experience, happy to continue learning from it, and wishing to keep on imagining and creating with my hands. Thank you cold, sunny and active Melbourne for kindly embracing me, my strength and my vulnerability during this adventure. ^_^




Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Australian Desert



“People used to hunt in the olden days and showed the young ones where to go to get food.” This is what Kathleen says while painting her beautiful desert. She’s a traveller like me, and her work and story inspired this image. 🌿

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Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Wavy plants for Ampilatwatja


This was one of my paintings interpreting Edie’s work :)
She talked about Ntang (edible seeds) that aboriginal children used to eat.
I loved how the leaves of each plant are wavy in her painting, giving a reddish underwater feeling.
The ARTISTS OF AMPILATWATJA short series is about to be completed! Can’t wait to see it @laradamiani & @karukaru.studio !
^_^🌿

Animated painting for Ampilatwatja


Illustration of Daisy, an aboriginal woman, whose fascinating painting process has been documented in ARTISTS OF AMPILATWATJA. She rhythmically added the coloured dots to the canvas. Her own painting is about the Kwenkart turkey bush, a medicinal plant used by her people for healing. This image was animated by @karukaru.studio as part of the lovely factual short series filmed by @laradamiani ^_^🌿

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Colour palettes for Ampilatwatja



Colour palettes & thumbs of paintings I did for @karukaru.studio & @laradamiani. ARTISTS OF AMPILATWATJA is a beautiful factual short series showing the painting process of aboriginal women in Australia, can’t wait to share more with you 😄🌿

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Friday, January 6, 2017

Monet: another study :)


Thoughts while painting this other piece by Claude Monet:
- I realised that I like intense saturated colours.
- White is never just white. In this painting I tried to be conscious about the colours behind the colour, and I was so aware that they became protagonists. I would love to be as subtle and efective as Monet! So much to learn ;)
- The forest is much more abstract and dynamic in my painting, maybe because I wanted to work fast so I wouldn’t over-work some areas more than others, maybe because I was excited :)
- The lady in Monet’s painting is more grounded, still, and made of “the same substance” as the world she inhabits. The lady of my painting seems to be adjusting, less rigid but also less secure. They seem to have different personalities. This is SO interesting!

- Working on someone else’s painting makes me feel connected to the artist, I definitely want to read more about Monet’s life! ^_^

Monday, December 5, 2016

Painting a Claude Monet's piece


Thoughts:
- because I'm in love with the brushstrokes I lost sight of the main purpose: study colour relationships.
- the "white" of the canvas is warmer.
- next time with impressionism: paint at 100% opacity to avoid blending.
- maybe muddiness can be avoided by applying pure colours.
- an initial tonal value study is useful.
- to concentrate in colour relationships, work with stains or bigger brushes.
- try to simplify the image into zones.
- identify the colours that are dominant, subdominant, subordinates and accents.
- Monet was one of the greatest!

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Painting a frame of Sleeping beauty


What I noticed:
- more details and textures in the foreground.
- less volumes in the backgrounds.
- colours change when placed next to each other.
- do a sketch first! remember relationships to the picture-plane.
- found the horse's tongue to be too bright, it's the first thing I see.
- characters tend to be simpler, easier to read, cleaner.
- a branch has many colours and saturations, the sun touches parts of it.
- work with intention: if I'm analysing colours, then shapes or textures are secondary.
- Eyvind Earle's work is AMAZING!